The Best Morning Greeting isn’t my Cellphone

This week’s Welcome to My World blog challenge question is, “What was your first thought when you woke up this morning?”

Before I broke the cellphone addiction:

I’d measure the morning hour by the darkness or light that slipped through the bedroom window covering. Most mornings, it was early when I awakened, 5:00 a.m. or earlier. In a groggy, sleepy state, my first thought was to find my cellphone. I fumbled around under my pillow or the nightstand before locating it. Relieved, I turned it on so I wouldn’t miss my 7:15 a.m. medicine alarm.

My cellphone greeted me with a bright light, power-up tune, and pings. I figured I may as well check my inbox and social media updates.

With one tap, I gold-stared emails in need of a reply, read some and deleted others, then scrolled news feeds and considered whose post to share. Next, I leaped into a mental checklist of domestic chores before jumping out of bed.

Already, the day felt heavy.

My first thought—to turn on the cellphone—didn’t inspire me to rise with an eager heart. Are mornings supposed to be this way? Lamentations 3: 22-23 tell us otherwise.

22 Through the Lord’s mercies we are not consumed,
Because His compassions fail not.
23 They are new every morning;
Great is Your faithfulness. (NKJV)

I had forgotten to greet God first, to speak praise and gratitude prayers, to put self-serving thoughts aside.

But guess what?

I stopped the routine in its tracks through prayer and setting new priorities. Now, after a groggy, Good Morning, Lord, I fumble around for my Bible.

Mornings are no longer heavy.

I still measure wake-up hours by the darkness or light that slips through my bedroom window covering. I still turn on my cellphone, but not until after I’ve experienced the Lord’s new compassions.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not perfect with my endeavor. Sometimes, upon waking, I think of my cellphone. But I know I have a choice. I know God waits for me, and I can’t wait to fill my mind with beautiful moments with Him.

What about you? What is your first thought when waking up? How do you greet the day?

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10 thoughts on “The Best Morning Greeting isn’t my Cellphone

  1. Oh yes! That is quite a habit to break! I am very much like you. I succeed about 90% of the time to say good morning to God and have my quiet time, but as one of the devotions I follow is on my mobile phone, it can get me down the rabbit hole if I see an important email while I look for the Devotion. I also find it really hard with time zones as I have to fit in SA, UK, Oz, and USA East and West Coasts. So I may need to quickly jump in to catch someone before they go to bed.

  2. Brilliant post, Dianne, and it whacked me just where I needed it. I never get out of bed before I’ve had my Quiet Time with the Lord – but I confess that leads to some pretty late mornings, as I fumble in my groggy state for my phone to check the time.Then as Deryn puts it so eloquently, I disappear down a rabbit hole!
    From tomorrow, no more rabbit holes. I will fumble for my QT books and then sit up to see the time on the digital clock on Rob’s side of the bed! The cellphone is now BANNED until after my QT.
    How? I’m going to put it on my dressing table across the room when I go to bed. Now, is that impressive?
    Keep me accountable, please!

  3. This is such an important reminder, thank you! I know that feeling all to well. And it really does make mornings heavy before the day has properly started.

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